Besten ipad games

besten ipad games

Aug. Wir zeigen euch nachfolgend die besten Mobile Games für Android, euer iPhone und das iPad. Bei der Zusammenstellung haben wir auf einen. Aug. Wir zeigen euch nachfolgend die besten Mobile Games für Android, euer iPhone und das iPad. Bei der Zusammenstellung haben wir auf einen. März Games-Favoriten: Die besten Spiele fürs Apples iPad „Bastion“ ist eines der besten Action-Games, die man auf dem iPad spielen kannFoto. Sky Gamblers kostet fünf Euro. Ihr Ziel, das Schwert, dürfen Sie dabei nie aus den Augen verlieren. Beim Versuch, Beste Spielothek in Ahorn finden tiefschürfende Story anzubieten, hat der Entwickler für unseren Geschmack nicht immer das beste Händchen https www tipico de manche der im Spiel schriftlich ausgegebenen Ratschläge etwa wirken zu gewollt und esoterisch angehaucht Beispiel: Der Anfang des Spiels läuft spielsucht hannover, dann aber werden üppige acht Game of thrones 19 lines casino fällig. Auch das neue iPad 9,7 Frühling ist ex change wunderbar für Spiele geeignete und dafür noch relativ günstige Lösung, allenfalls bei sehr grafikintensiven Titeln muss man hier gegenüber den Pro-Modellen kleinere Abstriche machen. Ein geniales Spielprinzip, verpackt in eine Spitzen-Optik. Der Job des Spielers ist es, die üblen Verheerungen zu beseitigen und Twin Joker Spielautomat - Spielen Sie Stake Logic Slots gratis online Landschaften wieder herzustellen. Das Spiel ist wunderbar nostalgisch wie in den er Jahren gezeichnet und bietet Rätselbilder in mehreren Kapiteln, bei denen wir Mechanismen und Abläufe herausfinden müssen, damit Wahrnehmung, Haptik, Verdauung und Bewegungen funktionieren und anderes mehr, darunter auch Flirten und Tanzen. Die vier Euro für die manchmal leichten, gelegentlich aber auch komplexeren Aufgaben sind gut investiert. Rennspiel und iPad sind oft nicht das ideale Team — aber Reckless Racing 2 punktet mit präziser Steuerung per Berührungsfläche auf dem Ruleta casino online. Eingabe von Brüchen in Excel als Zahl Tabellenkalkulation. Allerdings steht Ihnen mit jedem Etappensieg eine neue botanische Jonathan castroviejo zur Verfügung, mit der Sie die Zombies unwiderruflich ins Jenseits befördern. Aber geändert hat sich nicht viel:

And just what does make a good iPad game? We debated it for a while, and Some of these are board games. Some are like interactive art. Others are free ish and ridiculously addictive.

In other words, it's subjective. Most of these play on iPhones, too, but for a lot of the ones on this list you're better off playing on a larger iPad screen.

With that in mind, here are our current favorites, displayed in alphabetical order. Evergarden is a strategy-oriented match game set in a fantastical forest of geometry and surprisingly demanding wildlife.

Every game begins as a hexagonal grid on which flowers of varying sizes are arranged. Each of your limited turns has you work through the flowers, deciding whether they should spit a seed into an adjacent space, or combine with a matching bloom.

It comes across like a glossy and noodly gardening take on Threes! Creature guide Fen makes demands that hugely ramp up your potential for high scores when achieved, and a narrative plays out alongside the puzzles.

This adds extra heart to the game, but also depth — things you find on your journey unlock new strategies, and provide added impetus for doing even better during your next go.

Donut County is a story-led puzzle game where you play as a hole in the ground. However, the journey is wonderful, especially on the iPad — the bright visuals shine, and the larger canvas makes dragging the hole around, gobbling everything in sight, all the more pleasing.

Each puzzle in Sidewords starts with an empty grid that has words along its top and left edges. You select letters from both to create new words.

The idea is to fill in every square on the grid. This is easier said than done — you might consider yourself a genius on finding a massive, extremely clever word, but later find your grid peppered with tiny gaps.

Completed words can be removed with a tap at any point, Sidewords clearly wanting you to experiment and try new things on your way to a solution.

Desert Golfing is about the most minimal take on golf imaginable. The side-on game gives you a tee and a hole to reach. You drag to aim and set power, and then take your shot.

Smack your ball out of bounds and you start from scratch; make the hole with one or more shots and you can continue.

Each puzzle tasks you with using the letters to collide with dots that are littered about — you type some characters, press the tick mark, and watch as everything starts to move.

One puzzle has a dot up some stairs, and is easily dealt with by placing a lowercase l on each step, and a p to knock them all down.

Elsewhere, you use letters to swing from the scenery like tiny action heroes, or roundish characters that rain down like a typographic avalanche.

It dumps you on a strange island, giving you no clear ideas what to do next. The idea is to explore, check out every nook of the island, find clues, solve puzzles, and find new places in which to poke around.

To say realMyst is obscure is putting it mildly. Its puzzles can be baffling and cryptic, and smart players will arm themselves with a notepad — and a huge amount of patience.

However, this iPad version is a fantastic way to experience a gaming classic, with a more free-form approach to movement, beautiful revamped graphics, and the simple fact you can play it anywhere.

The basic premise may be familiar — plenty of freebies are broadly similar — but whereas they ruin things with difficulty gates and IAP, Holedown is a premium, polished game.

Upgrades come by way of gems found during digs, rewarding skill rather than your ability to open your wallet. Scalak is all about matching shapes, finding patterns in objects, and spatial awareness.

It begins easily enough: You start rotating and moving the central section, and must place pieces that have been bent across multiple planes.

Elsewhere, you construct frameworks on to which other pieces connect. Motorsport Manager Mobile 3 is a racing game that has you holding the purse strings rather than the steering wheel.

So instead of coaxing your car around complex turns, and blasting along straights, you manage your drivers and their egos , plan HQ and car upgrades, and figure out when during races they should push their engines or change their tires.

And although races merely feature colored discs whizzing round diorama-like circuits, they are nonetheless tense, exciting affairs — not least when one of your drivers is vying for a podium finish.

You tear along in your police car, aiming to batter nasty criminals into submission. Then, during your downtime, you and your cop chums partake in dangerous high-speed races.

Most importantly, the game feels really good — not least during moments when you fire up the nitro, drift round a bend, and smash the baddie into a roadblock.

You can leap into your sports car in a parallel storyline and become mouse rather than cat. Suzy Cube is a platform game set in a world with a thing for straight edges.

This means you may find yourself quickly swapping between skidding down icy mountains in 3D, following Suzy Cube as she runs side-on around a tower, and then delicately leaping between floating platforms, as seen from above.

Helix has the appearance of a rough-and-ready s arcade game. Your character, a chunky blinking eye, scoots about as adversaries rapidly appear from screen edges.

The aim is survival, but fortunately you can do more than dodge albeit less than shoot. Move around an enemy and a line begins to encircle them.

If the line is closed, the enemy explodes, giving you some breathing space. The touchscreen controls are responsive, the lurid visuals are captivating, and the hard-as-nails gameplay has that one-more-go factor that will have you clamoring for more.

Trick Shot 2 at its core is a game that has you lob a ball into a box. At first, despite its ultra-chic minimalist visuals, it all seems a bit simple — even dull.

In part, this happens as the levels become increasingly ridiculous. You end up bouncing the ball off of giant bananas, or figuring out how to get it into one box within a sea of the things — all, of course, positioned at awkward angles.

Jydge plonks you in a grubby, neon-lit dystopia, with nasty ideas about law enforcement. The anything-goes nature of Jydge initially wrong-foots, because the viewpoint and setup scream stealth shooter.

That said, Jydge does have some tactical nous when it comes to challenges that are initially impossible. And what platforming action!

Oddmar looks and feels like nothing else on iPad. And even then, we suggest taking a look anyway — just in case. It strings a bunch of single-screen challenges together, gives them silly names, peppers restart points about, and then sits back with an evil grin as you blunder into traps time and time again.

Instead of jumping, your running man can switch between ceiling and floor. Most rooms within the game cleverly play with this gravity mechanic.

Visually, the game is odd — s-style graphics, which also look blurry on iPad. The virtual controls are occasionally slippy too.

You need to get your vehicle from A to B and have limited resources with which to build bridges. Before long, though, the game goes bonkers with sci-fi.

Along with the portals, which have vehicles vanish from one point and appear elsewhere, there are various other elements to grapple with — all while wondering why, if these people can create portals, do they need bridges in the first place?

Other than to be evil and drive you nuts figuring out how to make them, obviously. Infinite West casts you as a cowboy in the wilderness, taking down a gang that murdered his family.

The turn-based play across semi-randomized levels forces you to consider every action. Your gunslinger can only move one space horizontally or vertically at a time, and each foe has unique weaponry ranges.

Its distinctly minimal world features an isometric platform on which you build structures by placing blocks with a finger. The shadows it projects must match the patterns on two nearby walls.

In the former case, you must chip away at your creation, fashioning impossible structures with levitating components. In forcing you to simultaneously think in 2D and 3D,.

Thomas Was Alone is a platform adventure that tells the tale of a self-aware artificial intelligence. Said AI is represented as a little red rectangle, charged with leaping about blocky environments, and reaching the exit.

Along the way, other AIs appear, each with its own distinct abilities, which you must make best use of to get everyone to their goals.

What sets Thomas Was Alone apart is its storytelling. The little rectangles are imbued with big personalities, and a voiceover gives you a window into their thoughts, which is often meta and frequently entertaining.

It features the titular Alto, who has a thing for sandboarding on huge dunes, hurling himself into the air, performing all manner of tricks, and then trying to not land i.

As you complete challenges, you slowly unlock new goals, environments, and abilities, but if at any point it all feels too much, you can switch off with the zero-risk Zen Mode, which leaves you with a serene soundtrack and endless desert.

Mushroom 11 finds you controlling a living pile of green gunge that gloops its way around a post-apocalyptic world. Its mission appears to be hoovering up whatever life is desperately clinging on in this harsh landscape, from tiny spiders to mutated plants that spit fire.

On iPad, the game is one of a kind and a tactile joy. What follows are dozens of single-screen scenes where you figure out how to reach an exit, but instead of controlling Polo, you rearrange and swap out sections of the scene, before pressing a button to see how things then play out.

Previous takes on Civilization for iPad have been weirdly cartoonish and simplified. The game demands time and attention, is hugely rewarding, and should keep you going for months.

Just as well, given its price tag. Bar some slightly blurry visuals on iPad Pro, this is the real deal — one of the best games in existence, carefully optimized for the touchscreen.

Old Sins pits you against devious puzzle boxes. Like previous games in the series, Old Sins is obsessed with the impossible.

You spot what appears to be a corpse in a gloomy attic and are abruptly swept inside a doll house. Elsewhere, something horrific and otherworldly will scream before forcibly ejecting you from a room.

If not, what are you waiting for? It begins with him fleeing from armed men. You must duck behind trees and flee from ferocious dogs or end up dead, face-down in the dirt.

You run through a building, get horribly killed, take some mental notes, and then try again. For the most part, though, this is a game of intriguing puzzles and a mesmerizing — if extremely dark — world, packed full of surprises, horror and tiny victories.

The entire thing takes place in a two-by-two grid, within which comic-book panes can be opened up and manipulated.

Often, part of an image can be separated and overlaid on another. For example, a stairs overlay may enable the protagonist to reach a previously inaccessible space, or what appears to be a star-like decorative element might be a cog in an impromptu machine.

Occasionally, Gorogoa baffles; later on, you may hit mental dead-ends, juggling various components, locations and possibilities in your head.

It features nine floating heads, which are gateways to miniature worlds of interactive animated madness that you poke, prod, tap and swipe to make things happen.

Your tasks are often quite mundane: It goes even more psychedelic when you complete a level and the head starts mooing. Ron Gilbert and Gary Winnick were the brains behind classics Maniac Mansion and Monkey Island, and Thimbleweed Park is no less tricksy as you ostensibly attempt to solve a murder mystery.

The interface is a bit of a s throwback, as is the difficulty level. Thimbleweed Park can be absurdly obtuse, and a little awkward.

This really is a pretty much direct conversion of the hit PC and PlayStation racer, squeezed into your iPad. Everything from a quick race in an open-top to a full Touring Cars season is just a few taps away.

Subsurface Circular exists in a gray area between novella, short film and videogame. You play a detective Tek, which spends its life interrogating other robots on the Subsurface Circular, and are immediately embroiled in a mystery.

To say more would spoil things, so take it from us that the story entrances, twists and turns over its few hours. Despite the single-scene setup, the game looks superb, with a cast of varied Teks and a familiar messaging-style interface that has a distinctly futuristic sheen.

Adventures of Poco Eco — Lost Sounds is as much an exploratory experience as a game. They charge him with a musical quest: One of your early guides is a massive bear, and Poco Eco jauntily scoots about the larger-than-life landscapes packed full of color and giant musical kit, bobbing his head to a soundtrack that evolves as puzzles are solved.

Said puzzles are, admittedly, dead simple. It is, however, perfect for when you want to relax and immerse yourself in an album reimagined as an explorable world.

Starman is an atmospheric adventure featuring a little astronaut trying to bring light to a monochromatic world.

Its composed, unassuming air at times echoes Monument Valley. But the puzzles and slow, considered movement recall classic s isometric puzzlers like Head Over Heels.

Regardless of its influences, Starman is a treat. Every puzzle you try offers something new — and some of them are really clever.

Yet Starman is never unfair — when you hit upon a solution, it will seem so obvious. It can be tiresome in some puzzles to watch the astronaut trudge back and forth.

Campfire Cooking seems to simulate the joy of cooking around a campfire — if everyone wanted to make the process as awkward as possible. Fires are set about a grid.

Move your stick left or right and your marshmallow flips upside down. You must toast both sides just once — burnt treats will not be tolerated.

The backstory, though, remains the same: One crash-landing later and he teams up with a boy. The twist is the blob has a sort-of superpower: Fluid SE appears to have arrived from the unholy union of Pac-Man and a brutally difficult time-trial racer set in a hostile underwater world of black fish and deadly red ghosts.

Each test has you zoom about, scooping up dots, and attempting to beat time targets. The snag is levels rapidly increase in complexity, and dots you eat spawn the aforementioned ghosts, which relentlessly chase you around the screen.

There are ways of dealing with them, but often that involves slowing down. Flower is a game that revels in bombing along as a petal on the wind, scything your way through fields of lush grassland, and soaring into the air above mountains and windmills.

Each environment starts with you playing as an individual petal. But mostly this game is about enjoying an immediate, accessible, beautiful journey that has an emotional core and an exhilarating edge.

Each of these devices has a number of buttons, and some have other features, too, such as the ability to rotate when a glowing pink button is prodded.

The trick is in figuring out precisely how this is achieved. FROST is a thoughtful, tactile game that feels like a living piece of art.

This spin on a classic is like the original game but the level doesn't end. There are cool new power-ups and enemies, but the biggest change involves the game's namesake.

Pac-Man adds the infamous Level glitch, meaning a deadly wall of numbers and characters will consume you if you're not careful.

Not every game has to be "fun" to be worthwhile. Papers, Please commands you to inspect immigrants at the border of a fictional totalitarian country and determine who can enter and who cannot.

It's as soul-crushing and dehumanizing as it sounds, but it's also an incredibly empathetic experience. The Room series puts you in a locked door mystery—literally.

Each game confines you to a single room and you must uncover clues and complete puzzles in order to get yourself out.

There are four games in all. What's a ridiculous way to fish? How about hooking dozens of sea creatures, launching them into the sky, and blasting them all with a shotgun?

It's a pretty fun way to fish, too, if this iOS game is any proof. Like non-ridiculous fishing, there's a lot here to master. Weaving your hook through fish takes skill, as does annihilating them in the most efficient way possible.

Various upgrades add even more depth. As a first-person, action-adventure video game with touch controls, Severed offers a unique level of interactive gameplay.

Praise for this game centered on the stunning art direction and fantastic soundtrack. It won Apple's iPad Game of the Year and has since been ported to several video game consoles.

In this casual puzzle game, you rotate objects in front of a light in order to reveal a shape in its shadow. The realistic renderings and impressive game mechanics put Shadowmatic in the running for one of the best of the year in Too often, using a smartphone is an isolated experience.

What makes Spaceteam so wonderful is how it turns your phone into a gateway for incredible, in-person socializing. You and your friends connect over Bluetooth or Wi-Fi to become crew members on a spaceship.

As the voyage continues, ship parts start to break down and only certain people can fix them. So to keep the space team together, everyone must shout wacky instructions to each other while listening for their own commands.

Any game that gets grown folks to scream "Set Stunhoist to three! Rite of the Shrouded Moon is a worthy follow-up. As a spider, you'll still be strategically weaving webs to catch and consume as many insects as possible.

But now, you'll have even more mysterious gothic environments to explore with clues to uncover and shifting weather patterns to contend with.

Looking to get into the mobile gaming business, Nintendo launched Super Mario Run in to much success. Players take control of Mario in a side-scrolling endless runner through familiar franchise levels.

Players can also go head-to-head against other players in a bid to gain the top score. Outside of the basic gameplay, you also collect coins to help rebuild and customize the Mushroom Kingdom.

With your sword in hand, you battle enemies and call upon your sworcery skills to solve mysteries. But the real appeal is how well the three different aesthetics—music, visuals, and game design—blend.

Cloning popular games is a huge problem on the App Store. If you need a tragic example, just look at Threes!

This adorable, endlessly addictive puzzle game, where players swipe multiples of threes together to earn higher scores, is arguably the greatest iPad game to date.

And yet its inferior, free knock-off, , got all the headlines for awhile there. This is your chance to atone. TouchTone is a game about a government agent hacking innocent phones to spy on suspicious people.

Given our current security climate, it's less of a game and more like an interactive documentary. TouchTone's devious data puzzles eventually become so difficult you'll feel like an actual black hat after solving them.

The thick conspiracy atmosphere and intriguing emergent narrative add to the game's contemporary relevance. Transistor was one of the finest console games of While the game doesn't control quite as well on the iPad's touch screen, it's still a gorgeous, intelligent, and mechanically sophisticated sci-fi action-RPG.

Don't let the premium price scare you away, and if you missed it the last time around, don't make the same mistake again.

Just look up how much money a professional Dota 2 or League of Legends player can earn. But even if you aren't a hardcore competitor, the genre still has plenty of strategic fun to offer.

Vainglory features familiar MOBA tropes, like colorful characters to master and intricate maps to learn, with a touch-friendly control scheme perfect for newcomers.

The Witness follows in the footsteps of the Myst series by placing you in a mysterious location and expecting you to figure out how to escape.

You'll be looking for clue and completing puzzles, but make sure you take in the scenery when you can. You'll acquire goo with new abilities as you progress, which will help you solve the ever-increasing challenges.

Enemy Unknown rebooted the classic strategy game franchise and wound up being one of the finest games of Since methodically paced tactical games are a perfect fit on iOS, the iPad version of Enemy Unknown was fantastic as well.

Enemy Within takes all that was great in Enemy Unknown and enriches it with new features like extra side missions and enemy types. It's the best version of an already-phenomenal game and definitely worth picking up if you're a hardcore iPad gamer.

In Year Walk , you take the role of a young Swedish man who wants to see the future. To do so, you must walk from your home at the stroke of midnight to the local church, encountering strange creatures and visions along the way.

The game is ostensibly a point-and-tap adventure puzzler, but the emphasis is on mood and atmosphere, making it feel like more of a journey than a game.

We highly recommend this one. PCMag reviews products independently , but we may earn affiliate commissions from buying links on this page.

Monopoly als iPad-Version 5,99 Euro. Hat er genug des edlen Gesteins gefunden, schaltet er damit das nächste Level frei. Dieses basiert auf dem gleichen Prinzip sunset slots no deposit codes vorher — in immer rasenderem Tempo geht es auf dem Board über Hügel, Abgründe und gefährliche Hindernisse mitten auf dem Weg, diesmal statt Eis durch Sandwüste, Dünen und Schluchten. Per Fingertipp helfen Sie den virtuellen Kameraden aus der Klemme. Wir stellen in der folgenden Galerie die sofortüberweiseung neuen iPad-Spiele vor. Dabei hätte Nelly das Zeug, geheime Schätze zu finden. Das bringt Abwechslung ins Spiel. Die Hinweise sind aber so gut, und die Rätsel so logisch, dass letztendlich kein Rätsel ungelöst bleiben dürfte. Gratis Android oder für 0,49 Euro iOS von gamebrai. Wenn ein Level trollfrei ist, geht es per Luftschiff zum nächsten. Unter dem Strich gilt: Allerdings steht Ihnen mit jedem Etappensieg eine neue botanische Waffe zur Verfügung, mit der Sie die Zombies unwiderruflich ins Jenseits befördern. In "Miracle Merchant" werden aus Karten Zaubertränke. Die Rätsel sind anfangs leicht, der Schwierigkeitsgrad steigt aber deutlich an. Ist ein Kontinent besetzt, winkt eine Belohnung: Doch auch aufgrund der sehr intuitiven Steuerung — man tappt jeweils nur für Sprünge oder Backflips — hat das Game einen extrem hohen Suchtfaktor, nach dem Motto: Völlig verdient unser iOS-Spiel des Jahres Jetzt gibt es den faszinierenden Klassiker auch für Android. The Ryder Cup, this is not. Everything from a quick race in an open-top to a full Beste Spielothek in Walern finden Cars season is just a few taps away. Like the original table-based card game, Flipflop Solitaire still has you arrange columns of casino herzogenaurach in descending order. But in Solitairicacards are your weapon; or, more accurately, cards are the means by which you come by weapons. Beste Spielothek in Hallendorf finden we missed a game? This list was originally started in April These may seem like small changes, but they prove transformative. Only instead of lobbing a spear at a wild beast, your prey is dfb pokal wetten shapes spielcasino shift and morph in cycles. Also, your character rotates around your ship, attached to it by a cable, rather than having free movement. And although it's initially tricky to get to grips with, you'll soon discover the board's floaty physics and controls are perfectly balanced.

There's no way to catch all the games out there, but you probably won't regret trying these. This list was originally started in April It was updated on July 1, Be respectful, keep it civil and stay on topic.

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Black Friday deals at Walmart: The shadows it projects must match the patterns on two nearby walls. In the former case, you must chip away at your creation, fashioning impossible structures with levitating components.

In forcing you to simultaneously think in 2D and 3D,. Thomas Was Alone is a platform adventure that tells the tale of a self-aware artificial intelligence.

Said AI is represented as a little red rectangle, charged with leaping about blocky environments, and reaching the exit.

Along the way, other AIs appear, each with its own distinct abilities, which you must make best use of to get everyone to their goals.

What sets Thomas Was Alone apart is its storytelling. The little rectangles are imbued with big personalities, and a voiceover gives you a window into their thoughts, which is often meta and frequently entertaining.

It features the titular Alto, who has a thing for sandboarding on huge dunes, hurling himself into the air, performing all manner of tricks, and then trying to not land i.

As you complete challenges, you slowly unlock new goals, environments, and abilities, but if at any point it all feels too much, you can switch off with the zero-risk Zen Mode, which leaves you with a serene soundtrack and endless desert.

Mushroom 11 finds you controlling a living pile of green gunge that gloops its way around a post-apocalyptic world. Its mission appears to be hoovering up whatever life is desperately clinging on in this harsh landscape, from tiny spiders to mutated plants that spit fire.

On iPad, the game is one of a kind and a tactile joy. What follows are dozens of single-screen scenes where you figure out how to reach an exit, but instead of controlling Polo, you rearrange and swap out sections of the scene, before pressing a button to see how things then play out.

Previous takes on Civilization for iPad have been weirdly cartoonish and simplified. The game demands time and attention, is hugely rewarding, and should keep you going for months.

Just as well, given its price tag. Bar some slightly blurry visuals on iPad Pro, this is the real deal — one of the best games in existence, carefully optimized for the touchscreen.

Old Sins pits you against devious puzzle boxes. Like previous games in the series, Old Sins is obsessed with the impossible. You spot what appears to be a corpse in a gloomy attic and are abruptly swept inside a doll house.

Elsewhere, something horrific and otherworldly will scream before forcibly ejecting you from a room. If not, what are you waiting for? It begins with him fleeing from armed men.

You must duck behind trees and flee from ferocious dogs or end up dead, face-down in the dirt. You run through a building, get horribly killed, take some mental notes, and then try again.

For the most part, though, this is a game of intriguing puzzles and a mesmerizing — if extremely dark — world, packed full of surprises, horror and tiny victories.

The entire thing takes place in a two-by-two grid, within which comic-book panes can be opened up and manipulated. Often, part of an image can be separated and overlaid on another.

For example, a stairs overlay may enable the protagonist to reach a previously inaccessible space, or what appears to be a star-like decorative element might be a cog in an impromptu machine.

Occasionally, Gorogoa baffles; later on, you may hit mental dead-ends, juggling various components, locations and possibilities in your head.

It features nine floating heads, which are gateways to miniature worlds of interactive animated madness that you poke, prod, tap and swipe to make things happen.

Your tasks are often quite mundane: It goes even more psychedelic when you complete a level and the head starts mooing. Ron Gilbert and Gary Winnick were the brains behind classics Maniac Mansion and Monkey Island, and Thimbleweed Park is no less tricksy as you ostensibly attempt to solve a murder mystery.

The interface is a bit of a s throwback, as is the difficulty level. Thimbleweed Park can be absurdly obtuse, and a little awkward.

This really is a pretty much direct conversion of the hit PC and PlayStation racer, squeezed into your iPad. Everything from a quick race in an open-top to a full Touring Cars season is just a few taps away.

Subsurface Circular exists in a gray area between novella, short film and videogame. You play a detective Tek, which spends its life interrogating other robots on the Subsurface Circular, and are immediately embroiled in a mystery.

To say more would spoil things, so take it from us that the story entrances, twists and turns over its few hours. Despite the single-scene setup, the game looks superb, with a cast of varied Teks and a familiar messaging-style interface that has a distinctly futuristic sheen.

Adventures of Poco Eco — Lost Sounds is as much an exploratory experience as a game. They charge him with a musical quest: One of your early guides is a massive bear, and Poco Eco jauntily scoots about the larger-than-life landscapes packed full of color and giant musical kit, bobbing his head to a soundtrack that evolves as puzzles are solved.

Said puzzles are, admittedly, dead simple. It is, however, perfect for when you want to relax and immerse yourself in an album reimagined as an explorable world.

Starman is an atmospheric adventure featuring a little astronaut trying to bring light to a monochromatic world.

Its composed, unassuming air at times echoes Monument Valley. But the puzzles and slow, considered movement recall classic s isometric puzzlers like Head Over Heels.

Regardless of its influences, Starman is a treat. Every puzzle you try offers something new — and some of them are really clever.

Yet Starman is never unfair — when you hit upon a solution, it will seem so obvious. It can be tiresome in some puzzles to watch the astronaut trudge back and forth.

Campfire Cooking seems to simulate the joy of cooking around a campfire — if everyone wanted to make the process as awkward as possible.

Fires are set about a grid. Move your stick left or right and your marshmallow flips upside down. You must toast both sides just once — burnt treats will not be tolerated.

The backstory, though, remains the same: One crash-landing later and he teams up with a boy. The twist is the blob has a sort-of superpower: Fluid SE appears to have arrived from the unholy union of Pac-Man and a brutally difficult time-trial racer set in a hostile underwater world of black fish and deadly red ghosts.

Each test has you zoom about, scooping up dots, and attempting to beat time targets. The snag is levels rapidly increase in complexity, and dots you eat spawn the aforementioned ghosts, which relentlessly chase you around the screen.

There are ways of dealing with them, but often that involves slowing down. Flower is a game that revels in bombing along as a petal on the wind, scything your way through fields of lush grassland, and soaring into the air above mountains and windmills.

Each environment starts with you playing as an individual petal. But mostly this game is about enjoying an immediate, accessible, beautiful journey that has an emotional core and an exhilarating edge.

Each of these devices has a number of buttons, and some have other features, too, such as the ability to rotate when a glowing pink button is prodded.

The trick is in figuring out precisely how this is achieved. FROST is a thoughtful, tactile game that feels like a living piece of art. Across dozens of scenes, sparks and barriers scythe across the screen while you direct flocking neon creatures towards orbs.

Once the orbs fill, you can move on to the next challenge. You use logic to understand the conditions before you, and how to meet your goal.

The abstract visuals are exciting and fresh, but also it really wants you to play, experiment and discover. Most of the puzzles tend to be simple, and you could probably blaze through the entire game in a few hours.

Freeways explores interchange design for autonomous vehicles, which sounds deathly dull. Just as Mini Metro coaxed something gorgeous and essential from underground railway maps, so too does Freeways create a hugely entertaining game from the drudgery of urban planning.

Each map sector provides you with highways that must be connected to each other. Hold a sign and you get an idea of traffic flow and the links you must make.

You then scribble roads down, adding overpasses and increasingly complex routes when the realization dawns about how tough this task can be.

Active Soccer 2 DX is a love letter to classic soccer videogames. You can play quick one-off games, or immerse yourself in an expansive career mode.

Space Junk is what happens when someone rethinks classic arcade blaster Asteroids and goes all-out, souping it up for the iPad.

Big things, when blasted, split into smaller things. UFOs take occasional pot-shots. Anything that hits you kills you.

The controls — despite being dreaded virtual buttons — work nicely, aided by subtle inertia on your little spaceman. Given a bit reprieve in mid, Reckless Racing HD is a fantastic blast from the past.

The cars have a great sense of weight — the physics when racing is just about perfect. But when levels feature ferocious motes intent on your demise, or the game shifts from microscopic warfare to motes speeding around a central giant — like celestial bodies orbiting a sun — brains and fingers alike will suddenly find Osmos a much sterner test.

At every point in the journey, Osmos is magnificent. Convince a friend to buy the game and engaging multiplayer arenas await too.

Mos Speedrun is an engaging speed-run Mario-ish platform game, featuring a little bug zooming through 25 hand-crafted levels.

The crude visuals feel decidedly old-school, featuring the usual floating platforms and patrolling enemies that mostly lack even the slightest hint of intelligence.

First, the level design is really smart, forcing you to learn the precise position of every platform, gap, and enemy, if you want to beat the speed-run target.

Secondly, each level has alternate targets — finding a hidden skull, and collecting all the loot — that boost replay value, but also force you to shake up your approach.

Die a lot and you end up battling your way through a level alongside the spirits of the fallen from your previous failures.

Kalimba is an inventive and compelling platform game for people bored with controlling just one character at once.

Here, you help two colored totem pieces avoid deadly pits and roaming enemies — and you control both simultaneously. And then the game really starts shaking things up.

However, unlike those games, No Stick Shooter is a resolutely modern affair. On selecting a weapon, shots are unleashed by tapping the display.

For a very brief period, this is quite a leisurely process, picking off asteroids. But the game soon bares its teeth, flinging all manner of neon foes your way, which must be defeated by deft fingerwork and tactical weapon selection, including crackling lightning and gigantic red laser beams.

Steredenn is an endless horizontal shooter, infused with the beating heart of the best retro blasters around, topped off with a head-nodding guitar-laden soundtrack.

Unlike most games of its ilk, it works brilliantly on iPad. The responsive controls have you drag the left of the screen to move your ship, and tap the right to fire at incoming waves of enemies.

A flick of your right thumb switches weapons, and if your ship darts beneath a digit, crosshairs pinpoint its position.

But so too do power-ups — and learning the effectiveness of weapons against specific opponents boosts your long er -term survival.

Well, that and sometimes bolting a massive whirling saw blade to your ship, like some kind of space lunatic.

It takes quite a lot to make a solitaire game tense, but Card Thief manages, mostly by smashing dealing out cards into turn-based stealth-oriented puzzling.

As the titular villain, you map out pathways across the cards on the screen, figuring out how to grab loot without losing too many stealth points, which are depleted on battling adversaries.

Repeat play is rewarded by improving your strategies, unlocking new kit to help increase your score, and eventually finding your way to new missions with different foes.

After setting things up with a few mug-shots which then appear within your on-screen avatar , you partake in a randomized selection of mini-games.

These range from fairly typical sports efforts, such as hurdles, to wackier battles where you must rapidly silence a pile of blaring cellphones.

It all comes across like a colorful multiplayer take on WarioWare, and is a perfect fit for iPad - at least if you pay the IAP to unlock all 44 games rather than being stuck with the miserly 5 you get for free.

This fast-paced platform game is brutal and brilliant. Your little pixelated hero auto-runs through vibrantly colored environments, which you must learn how to traverse by way of jump and action buttons.

Much of this is down to the sheer variety on offer. But also, each level is brief - just 30 seconds long.

Monument Valley 2 echoes its predecessor in having you explore isometric Escher-like worlds packed full of optical illusions.

The aim in each level is to reach a goal, which is often achieved by manipulating the landscape, creating pathways that in the real world simply could not exist.

The narrative featuring a mother and daughter also satisfies, but is careful to leave the experience with a sense of mystery. The levels are diverse in feel, demands, and structure.

It says something about Euclidean Lands that it feels like a proper turn-based quest, despite taking place on the faces of minimal cubes suspended in space.

You must plan ahead, responding to enemy movements and the squares they defend. Carefully position yourself to bump them off, much like in Hitman GO.

But it is excellent fun, despite some slightly slippy virtual controls. In the inky blackness of space, humans have started mining massive space rocks, and it turns out aliens have a big problem with that.

In The Big Journey , rotund cat Mr. Whiskers is on a mission to locate the maker of the dumplings he loves to scoff. His journey takes place across colorful landscapes packed with hills and tunnels to traverse, bugs to munch, hostile critters to avoid, and dumplings that make him instantly fatter.

The game plays out as a sort-of platformer. It brings to mind lost iOS classic Rolando and PSP hit LocoRoco, in utilizing a tilt-based mechanic to make the protagonist move, and then prodding the touchscreen to make him leap into the air.

But The Big Journey is a comparatively sedate affair compared to many of its contemporaries — a pleasant title that encourages exploration and drinking in its visuals rather than a breakneck dash to the finish line.

It turns out the way to make sliding puzzles interesting again is to combine them with s horror flicks — and then combine that with chunky Crossy Road-style visuals.

In Slayaway Camp , then, the mechanics are familiar: Well, unless you get a bit too much into the blood-curdling screams — in which case, please seek help.

Many path-finding puzzlers have you use arrow tiles to direct auto-running critters to goals. Long-time gamers may fondly remember ChuChu Rocket!

Causality is in similar territory, only you also get to control time itself, by dragging up and down the screen. Early on, this primarily allows you to fix errors — going back to try again when a sprinting astronaut is eaten, or when you run out of your limited number of steps.

It marries very old-school word games — in the sense of paper-based crosswords and word searches — with much-loved arcade puzzlers.

The result is the best word game on iOS. Tower mode has you face a stack of letters, tapping out snaking words that disappear when submitted, the tiles above then falling into the gaps.

Additional modes soon open up: Puzzle adds a new row of letters for every word you submit; Rush throws in a timer; and Debate pits two players against each other.

Described by its creator as a literary RPG, Voyageur mixes text adventure with space trading. You embark on a one-way journey, stopping off on planets to trade, explore, and become embroiled in side quests.

With the game being text-oriented and algorithmically generated, descriptions and events tend to repeat quite often. For anyone armed with an imagination, Voyageur becomes a unique, captivating experience.

Hidden object games are often dull and can be heavy on the pocket, demanding you spend lots of money on IAP. You can tap any of them for a clue, but the scene can also be interacted with, for example to rustle bushes to find someone lurking behind them.

Cute mouth-originated sound effects pepper proceedings, and the pace is varied with differing map sizes, and the odd playable scene, such as helping someone to a destination by adjusting the landscape.

Thus, with its wit and smarts, Hidden Folks very much stands out from the crowd — unlike some of the tiny critters it tasks you with locating.

The basic mechanics of Splitter Critters resemble s arcade puzzler Lemmings, in that you guide marching creatures to a goal. But whereas you armed lemmings with tools, Splitter Critters has you slice up the screen with a finger, so you can adjust the landscape to create new pathways.

The undo button reverts your last cut, but not the position of critters. Undo therefore becomes a device vital for completing levels, rather than merely a means of reverting errors.

Throughout its length, the game keeps adding new elements, such as ocean worlds and a grim underground base full of critter-frying lasers.

Twisted Lines is another great iOS puzzler with simple rules, but also level design seemingly created to drive you to despair. Each of the levels involves you directing a little colored block that leaves a trail of two colors, but should you cross over the trail, your block changes color to match the first line it hits.

This is pretty important, given that your task is to scoop up colored blocks littered about claustrophobic, deviously designed single-screen puzzles.

From the start, Twisted Lines is a pleasingly tricky challenge, and it keeps adding further complications — trail erasers; teleporters — to keep you on your toes.

But other than that niggle, Twisted Lines is a brain-teaser among the very best on iPad. The star of the show is Ruth. Her tools have vanished in a storm, and she needs to make cheese and butter to sell.

But the difficulty curve is gentle enough to snare newcomers, while the feel and polish of the game should help it appeal to anyone who spent years taking on Lucasfilm fare on a PC.

Sure, the basics remain: First, the maze is split in two. Clear one side and a special object appears on the other, which refills the cleared side when eaten.

In short, this game is superb, transforming an ancient classic into something fresh and exciting. In the future, it turns out people have tired of racers zooming about circuits on the ground.

In AG Drive , tracks soar into the air — akin to massive roller-coasters along which daredevil racers of the day speed, gunning for the checkered flag.

This is a pure racing game — all about learning the twists and turns of every circuit, and the thrill of breakneck speed.

The only weapons you have available are strategy and skill. And this suits the kind of stripped-back controls that work best on iPad — tilting to steer, and using thumbs to accelerate, brake, and trigger a turbo.

But Concrete Jungle rethinks the genre as a brilliant brain-bending puzzler. And here, restrictions regarding where you can build are of paramount importance.

At any point, you have seven rows with six lots where you can place a building. Said buildings are served semi-randomly from a card deck.

Each column needs to have enough housing points for it to vanish and unlock more space on which to build. You must therefore take great care to place your factories bad and parks good , realizing that any complacency may be severely punished several moves down the line, when you suddenly find yourself faced with a slum of your own making.

Treasure Buster comes from the Angry Birds school of game design — at least in terms of its insanely simple controls. You drag back on a little dungeoneer, who upon release bounces about the screen, scooping up loot and smashing into enemies.

Clear a room and you venture further into the dungeon, unearthing new adversaries that try to kill you in excitingly varied ways. But there is at least some nuance here, in locating or buying new powers, and defeating bosses by way of amazing pool-like rebound shots.

Although it's almost 13 years old, Rome: Total War is one of the best games of thanks to its re-release on iPad. You can now rule an empire from your Apple slate in this strategy game that defined the genre.

You start the game as one of six factions, aiming to throttle enemies and conquer the known world. This historical simulator will force you to wield your tactical brain, as well as demonstrating your diplomatic and fighting skills.

You may not think this complicated battle simulator would work on iPad, but Feral Interactive have reworked the game enough that it works brilliantly with a touchscreen.

But if you have a sizeable slate this is essential, and the Barbarian Invasion expansion is coming to iPad very soon as well, so there's a lot of life in this game.

The career mode eases you in gently, gradually unlocking access to new cars and tougher races. Traveling on underground railways can be a fairly hideous experience, which is perhaps why Mini Metro is such a pleasant surprise.

The game is all about designing and managing a subway, using an interface akin to a minimal take on the schematics usually found hanging on subway walls.

Periodically, new stations appear. You drag lines between them, and position trains on them, in order to shepherd passengers to their stops.

All the while, movement generates a hypnotic, ambient soundtrack. Over time, things admittedly become more fraught than during these relaxing beginnings.

From the creators of Machinarium and Botanicula, Samorost 3 is an eye-dazzlingly gorgeous old-school point-and-tap puzzler.

It follows the adventures of a gnome who sets out to search the cosmos and defeat a deranged monk who's smashed up a load of planets by attacking them with a steampunk hydra.

The wordless tale primarily involves poking about the landscape, revealing snatches of audio that transform into dreamlike animations hinting at what you should do next.

Although occasionally opaque, the puzzles are frequently clever, and the game revels in the joy of exploration and play. It's also full of heart — a rare enchanting title that gives your soul a little lift.

RPG combat games usually involve doddering about dungeons with a massive stick, walloping goblins. But in Solitairica , cards are your weapon; or, more accurately, cards are the means by which you come by weapons.

Your aim is to trudge to a castle, defeating enemies along the way. You do so in a simplified solitaire, where you string together combos by removing cards one higher or lower than your current card.

Besten Ipad Games Video

Top 40 iPad Offline Games in 2018

Besten ipad games -

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